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Texas Tornado Flips Chevy Silverado – Driver Casually Drives Away (Video)

Tornadoes ripped through Central Texas this past week but one Chevy Silverado driver didn't seem too bothered when tossed by a tornado.

A series of tornadoes tore through Central Texas on Monday, March 21st. While there was destruction and injuries, perhaps the craziest moment came when a driver captured another truck being picked up by a tornado. After the tornado placed the Chevrolet Silverado 1500  back down, the driver simply continued driving down the road.

Tornado Flips Chevrolet Silverado 1500 

This might be the most Texas video I have seen. You can make out the truck in the left of the tweeted video below. The lightning strike at the beginning is absolutely savage!


More via the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.

The 2.5-ton truck was flipped over onto its right side and spun 360 degrees as debris flew wildly across the highway. The violent wind eventually flipped the truck back upright. Amazingly, the driver, who storm chaser Marcus Reynolds estimated to be about a 16- to 17-year-old boy, kept driving down the road. The driver suffered only a cut on his arm, according to Reynolds, who said he let the boy use his phone to call his parents.

It goes without saying, but if you suspect a tornado in your area, do not drive towards it. Don’t even get in your car. Hunker down and shelter in place.

Texans are a wild bunch. They ain’t gonna let some lil’ storm stop them from driving. 

Related: Carrie Underwood Recounts Terrifying Moment Her Sons And Husband Hid In “Saferoom” To Survive Nashville Tornadoes

Growing Up In Tornado Alley

I lived in the Texas panhandle, deep in the heart of Tornado Alley, for most of my life. Severe weather was a way of life. Most schools had fire drills, but my school had tornado drills. 

Spring and summer are considered “tornado” seasons for the area as cold and warm air clash as the seasons change and temperatures rise. 

I can’t count the number of times my town was under a “tornado watch.” It happened so often that the residents of Canyon, Texas hardly acknowledged a tornado watch. West Texans are hard-scrabble people who look at severe storms with a “bring it” attitude. 

On a few occasions, the storm’s roar was matched by the howl of a siren that would echo through the plains and farms I grew up near. When it would worsen, the entire neighborhood would cram into the basement of my house, which also happened to be my bedroom. 

Thankfully my town was spared severe damage. But this past Monday, certain cities, such as Jacksboro, Texas, were not so lucky.

Related: Extreme Close-Up Video Of Tornado Shows How Sudden The Weather Can Turn

How To Spot A Tornado

Growing up in Tornado Alley, schools and parents taught children how to look out for tornadoes. Contrary to popular belief, tornadoes and storms do not form suddenly. In fact, a keen eye can spot the beginning of a tornado hours before it develops. Here’s what to look out for.

  • A strong thunderstorm called a “supercell.” Supercells are massive storms that tower miles into the air. 
  • The warm air that rushes up in an “updraft.”
  • A “wall cloud” forms, and there is rotation due to the swirling air at varying temperatures.

It is always best to have an eye on your local meteorologist. They’ll have the best technology to tell you when a storm is forming and if you need to seek shelter.

In addition, there’s a big difference between a “tornado watch” and a “tornado warning.” A watch says that the elements for a tornado are present. A warning is that those elements are coming together to form a tornado. 

Did you grow up in Tornado alley? Would you ever chase a storm? Share your thoughts in the comment section below.

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Editor’s Note: The story has been updated to reflect the vehicle was a Chevy Silverado 1500 truck, not a Ford F-150 as originally stated.

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