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Nancy Pelosi’s Archbishop Rallies The People To Protest Restrictions On Worship

San Francisco's Archbishop organizes "Free The Mass" to protest religious discrimination in the Mayor's coronavirus restrictions on worship.

The Archbishop of San Francisco is pushing back against the state’s coronavirus restrictions on churches and worship. Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone put out a call for people to rise up to protest this religious discrimination at a “Free The Mass” event.

And there’s one thing for sure – this clergy led protest is a real slap in the face to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Protest Leader Is Nancy Pelosi’s Archbishop 

In many blue states and Democrat-run cities, coronavirus restrictions punish peaceful worshipers yet hypocritically make room for destructive acts, like rioting

San Francisco is one of those cities where local restrictions are inconsistent between worship and those applied to other non-religious activities.

While maskless Nancy Pelosi broke mandates by having a hair salon open so she could get a blowout, actual Catholics and other people of faith were taken to task with restrictions.

One local clergyman, Pelosi’s own Archbishop, is asking why worship is restricted if mass protests are allowed.

San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone has had enough and he’s blowing the whistle on the hypocrisy and discrimination.

Archbishop Cordileone wants people to join him to “Free the Mass” and publicly demonstrate in the streets on Sunday, September 21st.

This is what should be done in every city where worship is limited by state officials.

Related: Person of Interest Star Jim Caviezel Points to Ongoing US Church Closures As Evidence Christians Are Being “Persecuted for Their Faith”

Democrats Restricting Worship

Elected Democrats and bureaucrats who are limiting demonstrations of faith aren’t concerned about rioters and protesters in their cities.

The regulations are conflicting and appear to many to be a heavy-handed tool to limit and suppress activities of people of faith.

The Archbishop told priests that it is not the role of the government to “allow” people to worship or dictate to the Church what it can and cannot do. The civil government “cannot be so restrictive as to effectively ban public worship,” he wrote. 

There is a serious and obvious disconnect between places of worship and secular businesses.

Starting September 14th, Nancy Pelosi could legally get her hair done as salons and massage parlors re-opened, but only one person a time can be inside a church to pray.

It’s easier to get your nails done than it is to sit in a church pew. 

Religious Discrimination

From Catholic Herald

San Francisco Mayor London Breed had announced this week that starting September 14, houses of worship may have 50 people at religious services outdoors. In addition, indoor private prayer is allowed, but only one person at a time is allowed inside.

Previously, the limit for outdoor services had been 12 people, with all indoor services prohibited. The archdiocese covers the city and county of San Francisco— where the cathedral is located— as well as San Mateo and Marin counties.

In contrast, hotels in San Francisco are fully reopened; indoor gyms are set to reopen at 10% capacity; and most retail stores are allowed to operate at 50% capacity, while malls are restricted to 25%. Gyms operated in government buildings for police officers and other government employees have already reopened.

Nancy Pelosi has not confirmed attendance at “Free The Mass.”

Of course, we don’t know when the House Speaker last attended Mass. One could assume it was less recently than when she last got her hair done.

We applaud San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone for taking a stand against religious discrimination.

It’s imperative that Americans are safe. But it’s also an American’s right to worship. So it’s only right that state official equalize their guidelines on public gatherings.

Read next: After Leftists Put Out Call To Target Jesus, 90-Year-Old Statue Is Toppled And Beheaded In Texas

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